Quilled Moon and Star Paper Art {Tutorial}

Quilling is an art form that uses paper stripes and a slotted tool that looks like a sewing needle with the end clipped off.

Recently I was paid a visit by With a Spin, who left me with her beautiful cookie cutters.  Since I’m an artist, I didn’t even think of putting them in the kitchen and immediately I saw them as quilling walls to fill.

In the past, I’ve had to build my own walls to make letters or arabesque shapes. But here were walls that were reusable over and over to give me the same consistent shape.  I couldn’t wait to try them out.

To the disappointment of my baking daughter, the cookie cutters came into the studio.

I hope you enjoy this cookie cutter tutorial and look around your house for new, unusual, walls to fill. This post contains affiliate links.

 

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters Tutorial

Supplies
Paper crimping tool
Watercolor paper
White shadowbox frame
Moon and Star Cookie Cutters
Scissors
Glue
Quilling tool
Two colors of 12 inch quilling stripes

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Start by making beehive quilling stripes.  Start a little bit down one end and fold the paper onto itself. Take your tool out, go down a bit more on the strip and do it again.

I made four and a half to fill the moon.  For the star, I used 3 stripes, but I precut them all in half stripes before I beehived quilled them. The six small stripes fit in much better then trying to fit in the longer stripes in the star. (You’ll thank me for hours of your life back, trust me.)

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Wiggle them in. It’s a tight space. If you have tweezers or a toothpick, use them.

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Place glue dots where your paper meets.

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Run a strip through your crimping tool to make the paper corrigated.

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Wiggle your quilled piece out of the cookie cutter. I placed one of the same color around it first and then a contrasting color over that.

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Wait for everything to dry, peel off all the glue from your fingertips, then glue your shapes to your paper.

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

I used watercolor paper and this blue color because I still hadn’t cleaned up my workspace from our last art piece.

You can also use colored cardstock behind your shapes to make them stand out. Your next dilemma will be to decide on placement in the frame. Put them together? Place them apart?

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Of course, nothing can beat white background in a white frame. Always a classic.

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

For those that follow me on Instagram, you’ve already seen a sneak peek of playing around with different colors too.

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

There are two more shapes in the cookie cutter set. I might actually take the left over green triangles from my last project (did I already mention the messy workspace?) and start playing around with architecture.

You never know when another cookie cutter quilling might show up again. Stop by A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see other tutorials that teach about the Arab world.

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Arabic Wooden Sorting Game {Resource}

Today I am getting together with a few of my blogging friends, and we are sharing multicultural toys and activities for kids.   I wanted to introduce you to this Arabic Wooden Sorting Game.

When my children were small, my parents brought them this Arabic sorting game from one of their many travels.

Arabic Wooden Sorting Game by A Crafty Arab

This game has been one of our favorites over the years because it introduced children to a few words at a time to get them started learning Arabic.

The game comes in a self contained box for storage, a lid that slides in and out and 8 slots inside.

It comes with five large wood pieces and forty small ones.  The five large, long wood pieces have Arabic letters, Arabic numbers, shapes, food and animals on them.

Arabic Wooden Sorting Game by A Crafty Arab

The smaller, square pieces have the same objects, only on individual squares.

Arabic Wooden Sorting Game by A Crafty Arab

To play, you place a large wood piece in a sliding slot on the lid when the box is closed. You choose one of the smaller wood pieces and place it into the open slot.

Here the number one is getting ready to go into the number one slot.

Arabic Wooden Sorting Game by A Crafty Arab

We also used to flip the squares over and play a matching game before we created our own last year.

Arabic Wooden Sorting Game by A Crafty Arab

To see more multicultural games and toys for teaching children languages, check out
Multicultural Toys and Activities for Kids by For the Love Of Spanish and
Playing With Traditional Music Instrument by Maria Magdalena.

5 Ways to Say I Love You in Arabic {Resource}

With Valentines Day around the corner, love is in the air.

I thought it might be fun to give you ideas on how to show your hobb (Arabic for love) in another language this year to be different.

Here are 5 ways to say I love You in Arabic.

1. Proclaim some Hobb

Arabic is an Afroasiatic langauge, and similar to it’s Semitic siblings, nouns change depending on if you are talking to a girl or a boy.

Arabic is comparable to French, where nouns ending in -e tend to be feminine, or Irish, where nouns ending in -óir/-eoir and -ín are always masculine, and those ending -óg/-eog or -lann are always feminine*.

In Arabic, we use diacritics because our language is adjad. We place a Fatḥah above a letter and a Kasrah below to determine the grammatical gender.

The Arabic word for I is Ana and the word for Love is Hobb. So placing the two together is Ana Hobb, but you need to also add an ending depending on who you are addressing.

If you are saying I Love You to a woman, you place the fatḥah under the last letter:
أنا أحبكِ – ana ahobbuki.

If you are saying I Love You to a man, you place the kasrah over the last letter:
 أنا أحبكَ – ana ahobbuka.

If you are saying I love you to a group of three or more people you add a letter to the end:
 أنا أحبّكم – ana ahobbukum.

There are also different ways to say I love you in different situations, from love in the Bible to love for a lover. You can also hear some of them here.Or use this graphic.

2. Mail some Hobb

I started my business eight years ago because I couldn’t find cards to give my loved ones that were in Arabic. Since then I’ve created many options for others to send some love.

Here are some cards that I made in my studio this week that will all be listed in my Zibbet shop soon.

5 Ways to Say I Love You in Arabic by A Crafty Arab

3. Sing some Hobb

Mohammed Foaud is an Egyptian vocalist who has a wonderful Arabic love song called El Hob El Haqiqi, which translates to My Love That Is True.

In the song, he sings of a love that

Teaches us how to forgive and to forget about yesterday.
Teaches us to constantly think about the forthcoming days.

Listen to the full song here:

Umm Khalthom is another Egyptian vocalist who also has a fantastic song called Night of Love. I remember many nights listening to this coming from the radio in our house.

4. Eat some Hobb

A saying of the past was “A way to a man’s heart is his stomach” but honestly, doesn’t food work on just about anyone?

Valentine’s Day is in February, which tends to be a dark, cold month for us.

How about making some Arabic soup for your loved one? You can try Palestinian Spinach and Lentil Soup,
Egyptian Tomato and Chickpea Soup
or Lebanese Lentil Soup.

For dessert, you can even try some Baklawa Pops.

5. Read some Hobb

Looking for some poems to read to your loved one? Check out my book section in my Amazon library (I’m an affiliate member). If you are looking for love poems to read, grab this book to serenade your hobb.

http://amzn.to/1KX0c8D
Learn to Say I Love You (Correctly) in Arabic by A Crafty Arab

There are so many ways to say I love you in Arabic. I hope you try one of them this Valentines Day!

*Grammatically there are always exceptions to these rules and endings for all languages. Please check a dictionary or local dialects to verify.

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