12 Muslim Children Books For Father’s Day {Resource}

Father’s Day is this Sunday so I put together a list of my favorite Muslim children books to encourage great father-child interactions.

Some came from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, while a few are from American Muslims or other parts of the world were Muslims live. A couple even include grandfathers.

They make a great gift for dad, to show him how much he is appreciated. You can also send the link to your school librarian to add to their offerings that showcase Muslims in everyday life.

The titles will take you to the Amazon page to purchase them. Any money made from the affiliate sales of these books helps cover the craft supply costs of this free educational blog.

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A Balloon for Grandad by Nigel Gray (Author), Jane Ray (Illustrator)

Unhappy when he loses his silver and red balloon, Sam is comforted by imagining it on its way to visit his grandfather in Egypt.

Drummer Girl byHiba Masood (Author), Najiyah Maxfield (Editor), Hoda Hadadi (Illustrator)

Year after year, in the blessed month of Ramadan, little Najma has happily arisen to the drum beat of her neighborhood’s musaharati. He walks through the streets of her small Turkish village, waking each family for the pre-dawn meal before the long day of fasting. Najma wants nothing more than to be a musaharati herself one day, but no girl has ever taken on the role before. Her father nurtures her wishes, and encourages her to fulfill her dreams!

Bilal Cooks Daal by Aisha Saeed (Author), Anoosha Syed (Illustrator)

Six-year-old Bilal is excited to help his dad make his favorite food of all-time: daal! The slow-cooked lentil dish from South Asia requires lots of ingredients and a whole lot of waiting. Bilal wants to introduce his friends to daal. They’ve never tried it! As the day goes on, the daal continues to simmer, and more kids join Bilal and his family, waiting to try the tasty dish. And as time passes, Bilal begins to wonder: Will his friends like it as much as he does?

The Butter Man by Elizabeth Letts (Author), Ali Alalou (Author), Julie Klear Essakalli (Illustrator)

While Nora waits impatiently for dinner, her father stirs up a story from his childhood. During a famine Nora’s grandfather must travel over the mountain to find work so he can provide food for his family. While young Ali waits for his father’s return, he learns a lesson of patience, perseverance, and hope.

Clever Ali by Nancy Farmer (Author), Gail De Marcke (Illustrator)

Ali is finally old enough to join his father in tending pigeons for the evil Sultan of Cairo. The boy is given a pet pigeon, but warned NEVER to feed it too much, lest it become spoiled and lazy. But Ali feels sorry for his hungry pet and disobeys. When the overfed bird becomes greedy and ruins a plate of the Sultan’s cherries, Ali is in big trouble! Now he has only three days to replace the Sultan’s 600 cherries from the snowy mountains of Syria. Only then can he save his father from the dreaded Oubliette: a deep pit where a giant demon is waiting!

The Hundredth Name by Shulamith Levey Oppenheim (Author), Michael Hays (Illustrator)

This picture book for young readers about family, friendship and faith is rich in the details of Middle Eastern village life. It tells the warm story of a bond between a father, a son, and the son’s favorite camel, as well as their devotion to the Muslim faith, and the power of prayer in their daily life.

Ibrahim by Francesc d’A Sales (Author), Eulalia Sariola (Illustrator)

It’s a big day for Ibrahim when he starts work at his father’s stall in the market place of Marrekesh. The market is alive with bright colors and the cries of vendors. Ibrahim is excited not only to be a part of all the bustling activty, but also to be entering the world of grown-ups.

The Little Green Drum by Taghreed Najjar (Author). Hassan Manasrah (Illustrator)

Samia’s father has a very important job. He is the Dawn Waker-Upper for the whole village, during the holy month of Ramadan. But one year, just before Ramadan, her father is not very well. Can Samia take his place as the Waker Upper?

My Dad’s Beard by Zanib Mian (Author), Laura Ewing (Illustrator)

An adorable little character shows us how much he admires his dad by sharing amusing observations and heartfelt sentiments of his beard, and why he and the others love it! A warm and loving family. A perfect picture book to read aloud, or for small children to read to themselves time and time again.

My Father’s Shop by Satomi Ichikawa

Mustafa loves a particular rug in his father’s shop. It has a hole in it, so he can put it over his head and still see out. His father wants to teach his son some foreign languages, but Mustafa runs off to the bustling Moroccan market instead (with his favourite rug on his head). There he finds a different way of learning other languages – and of getting tourists to his father’s shop.  

My Grandfather’s Masbaha by Susan Daniel Fayad (Author), Avery Liell-Kok (Illustrator)

One summer day at his grandparents’ home in Lebanon, Adam gets upset after his friends leave after a play date. His grandfather (Jidoo Yousef) helps him realize how much he has. By using the masbaha (a string of beads) he learns how to count his blessings.

Yo Soy Muslim: A Father’s Letter to His Daughter by Mark Gonzales, Mehrdokht Amini (Illustrations)

Written as a letter from a father to his daughter, Yo Soy Muslim is a celebration of social harmony and multicultural identities. The vivid and elegant verse, accompanied by magical and vibrant illustrations, highlights the diversity of the Muslim community as well as Indigenous identity. A literary journey of discovery and wonder, Yo Soy Muslim is sure to inspire adults and children alike.

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Stop by A Crafty Arab’s educational page to see more book lists, like these

99 Muslim Children Books

99 Ramadan Children Books

Be sure to visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see other book lists, reviews and tutorials that teach about Muslim culture or the Arab world.

2019 Ramadan Crafts 30 Day Challenge Roundup {Resource}

Shukran (Arabic for thank you) to everyone that followed our Ramadan crafts 30 day daily challenge of creating an activity that teaches about Arab culture or the Muslim world.

My family would like to wish our blog reading community an Eid Mubarak.

Eid Al Fitr is today, the holiday that comes at the end of Ramadan and Eid Mubarak is a greeting that means Blessed Eid.

We started our 30 day Ramadan crafts challenge back in July 2011. Our tradition has continued annually through 2012, 2013, 2014. 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018.

Here are the 2019 Ramadan crafts daily challenge posts

Ramadan Day 1 Ramadan Perler Mosque {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 2 Ramadan Ice Cream Calendar {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 3 Lantern Love Decor {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 4 Arabesque Paint Chip Coasters {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 5 Teabag Folding Khatam Card {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 6 Protective Nazar Rocks {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 7 Ramadan Circle Wall Decor {Tutorial} Guest Post

Ramadan Day 8 Ramadan Indian Food Word Search {Printable} plus Let’s Celebrate Ramadan & Eid {Book Review}

Ramadan Day 9 Ramadan Moon and Star Bird Feeder {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 10 Nakba Shrinky Dink Key Chain {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 11 Moon and Star Bookmarks Card {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 12 Gallery Glass Zakat Minaret {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 13 Libya Collage Pin {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 14 Color Shift Glitterific Mosque Decor {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 15 Khatam Atom Caution Sign {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 16 Ramadan Popsicle Suncatcher {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 17 Moroccan Harira Soup {Recipe}

Ramadan Day 18 Eid Aperture Card {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 19 Bismillah Round Placemat {Tutorial} Guest Post

Ramadan Day 20 Ramadan Word Scramble {Printable}

Ramadan Day 21 Eid Sequence Paper Plate {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 22 Allah Gallery Glass Suncatcher {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 23 Arabesque Felt Tea Coaster {Tutorial} Guest Post

Ramadan Day 24 6 Kid Approved Stuffed Dates {Recipe}

Ramadan Day 25 Eid Gallery Glass Cheese Tray {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 26 Recycled Oui Tea Lights {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 27 Chocolate Moon and Star Krispie Treats {Recipe}

Ramadan Day 28 Arab Women Cartoon Book {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 29 Recycled Minaret Money Favor {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 30 Recycled Cardboard Oud {Tutorial}

Stop by A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more tutorials that teach about Muslim culture and the Arab world.

Recycled Cardboard Oud {Tutorial}

My husband made play ouds as part of our Ramadan crafts, out of recycled cardboard because I was only able to bring one oud for our 3 girls from Morocco.

The oud (Arabic: عود‎) is a short-neck pear-shaped stringed instrument with 11 or 13 strings grouped in 5 or 6 courses. It is used predominantly in Western Asia/North Africa and very similar to modern lutes.

I walked by an oud stand at the Rabat souk, every day on my way to teach art and English at a local school. Honestly, I wanted to buy a large oud, but had no way to bring it on the airplane.

I settled on a smaller decorative oud, but when I got home, I could only give it to one of my daughters to hang in her room.

My husband went online and found instructions one how to make a cardboard play guitar and adjusted them for the oud. He made two of them, with different colored “strings” or rubber bands. He then presented them to our other daughters as Eid gifts today. My youngest daughter, who had received the decorative oud, helped him with the hot glue gun since he had never used one before.

Below are the steps he took to make these cardboard play ouds, in case you’d like to try your own.

Supplies

  • Large rubber bands
  • Pencil
  • Drill & bit that is the same size as the rubber bands
  • Two small dowels
  • Two paper clips
  • Hot glue gun
  • Recycled cardboard
  • Glass (or other small round object for center hole)
  • Decorative oud to trace

To make his cardboard oud, my husband started by tracing out the miniature oud on the cardboard and cutting out three shapes. Also make sure to cut out the circles in the center. My husband used a drinking glass from the kitchen to trace out small circle hole.

To make the back of the oud round, he also cut out four more shapes, without the neck, in descending sizes.

My daughter used the hot glue gun to attach two of the larger pieces together and then she set them aside to cool.

So that the bridge is not too high on the cardboard, my husband used the Xacto to cut out a notch the length of the red dowel. Directly below that cut, he made markings for the “stings” to go through.

He made sure to do the same thing to hold the bridge at the neck of the cardboard oud.

Next my daughter used the hot glue gun to attach the two red dowels. She pushed them each gently into the cut out notches, but not too far. Her father then used the drill to make four small holes that are big enough to fit the rubber bands.

Since the rubber bands will be pulling on the oud neck, my husband used the xacto to create four notches for them to fit into. This will help the “strings” stay in place.

Next we used the tip of the pencil to push the end of the rubber bands into the holes.

Once the rubber bands were through, we used a paper clip to secure them to the back side.

We used the hot glue on to hold down the paper clip, trying to be careful not to get any on the rubber bands since they could melt. We also added the other larger cardobard layers of the oud to hide the paper clips.

Make sure to hold down the cardboard while gluing to help give the oud more durablity while being handled by children.

Once the glue had dried, my husband turned the oud over to hot glue the smaller pieces to give the back a domed look.

Our play oud was done and ready to be enjoyed. Maybe we’ll make a few more and paint them this time.

Be sure to check out these other fun toys we have made in the past.

Recycled Cardboard Mosque {Tutorial}

Eid Rattle Drum {Tutorial}

Stop by A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more tutorials