Repurposed Moon and Star Salsa Tray {Tutorial}

Hispanic and Latino American Muslims have one of the highest conversion rates into Islam right now.

 

Hispanic and Latino Americans are an ethno-linguistic group of citizens of the United States with origins in the countries of Latin America or the Iberian peninsula.

 

Today I talked to my daughters about the similarities between Islam and Latino culture while we made salsa. When we were done, we were getting ready to put it into our very used and loved salsa tray when I realized that the tray looked like a crescent moon.

 

So off we went, to the studio, to repurpose our salsa tray from drap to fab.  If you do plan on putting food in yours, like we do ours, please use plastic wrap between the paint and your food.

 

We used the brushed metal paint I  had received as a Plaid Ambassador, giving the moon and star that extra shiny look.

 

Supplies

Salsa tray
Paint- black, silver, gold
Paintbrushes
Paper
Pen
Scissors

First we placed the paper over the salsa opening and drew out it’s size. We then drew in a star to cover the entire circle.

Next we cut out the star.

Make sure your tray is very clean, and dry, before you start to paint.

We then placed our star into the circle and very carefully painted around the outline. We also used the curve of the bowl to outline a moon shape in the main opening. Once we finished the outlines, we also painted the outer rim in black.

We painted the star in gold and the moon in silver.

Let everything dry for 24 hours. This one was hard since our salsa was still in the kitchen!

 

Just a reminder the paint is not food safe, so please put some kind of napkin or plastic wrap between your chips and the tray. Please do not expose your salsa to the painted star and use a smaller, clear bowl or plastic wrap.

Stop by other kitchen items we have repurposed

Morocco Flag Candy Dish {Tutorial}

My First Ramadan Plate {Tutorial}

Or visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest for other tutorials that teach about the Arab and Muslim world

Saudi Arabia Creamy Tomato and Chickpea Soup {Recipe}

I was sent the cookbook The Arabian Nights Cookbook: From Lamb Kebabs to Baba Ghanouj, Delicious Homestyle Middle Eastern Cooking by Habeeb Salloum from Tuttle Publishing.

 

It focuses primary on recipes in the Arab Gulf region and has to be one of the most beautiful cookbooks I’ve seen in a long time.

 

I was pressed for time this week to look for dinner options for our Mawlid al Nabi celebration tonight and took the cookbook with me on the bus to work. {Mawlid al Nabi commemorates the birthplace of the Prophet Mohammed (pbuh), in Saudi Arabia. This annual Islamic holiday is celebrated by many Muslims around the world.}

 

On the bus, I caught my seat mate leaning in, reading over my shoulder and by the time we reached our destination, she had already asked where she can buy it.   The photos were so eye catching that she couldn’t resist.

 

The book is broken up into the traditional chapters (salad, soup, chicken, seafood, drinks, desserts, etc) and includes an opening chapter on popular condiments and pickles.  The intro is a well written explanation of the diversity of modern Arab Gulf cooking, followed up with useful tools and essential ingredients. Reading the chapter on the spices, nuts and vegetables unique to the region made me long for the smells I experienced in the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul, Turkey.

 

The recipes include tips and notes on everything from how to stuff a lamb to which meals are best served family style. The stunning chapter introductions explain the dishes and their influences from surrounding regions. Finally, the resource guide includes Arab stores country wide where tools and ingredients can be found.

 

I’d like to share the recipe for the Creamy Tomato and Chickpea Soup. But you don’t have to wait for the annual Mawlid al Nabi to enjoy this yummy delicious meal, you can make this anytime.

 

(Readers of the blog will note the similarities of this dish to the Egyptian Tomato and Chickpea Soup we made a few years ago.  This version includes a few differences, most notably, the addition of fresh cilantro, an herb introduced historically by Western Asia to the area.)

 

Ingredients

4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
4 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro
2 minced onions
4 cloves garlic, crushed to paste
2 cups cooked chickpeas, drained
6 cups water
2 cups stewed tomatoes
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
Pinch of ground red pepper

Pour the oil into a large saucepan with a lid and place over medium heat. Add the coriander leaves and onion and saute for 10 minutes, uncovered.

Add the remaining ingredients, stir and bring to a boil. Cover and cook over medium heat for 25 minutes.

Remove from heat and allow to cool, slightly.

Purée, then return to the saucepan, adding more water if desired. Reheat and serve.

We served our soup with a side of naan bread.

To enjoy more Arab food we have tried, please check out

Egyptian Ful Medames {Recipe}

Hot Algerian Lasagna {Recipe}

Lebanese Lentil Soup {Recipe}

Or stop by A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see out more recipes from the MENA (Middle East & North Africa) region.

Be sure to check out the book The Arabian Nights Cookbook: From Lamb Kebabs to Baba Ghanouj, Delicious Homestyle Middle Eastern Cooking by Habeeb Salloum from Tuttle Publishing or ask for it a your local bookstore, library or Amazon.

Chenille Stem Whirling Dervishes {Tutorial}

Islam has close to 2 billion followers world wide. Many Muslims, followers of Islam, choose to practice different types of dhikr, a devotional act in which prayers are repeatedly recited.

 

Some of these Muslims are the known as the Mevlevi Order, a Sufi order founded by the followers of Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Balkhi-Rumi, a 13th-century Persian poet, Islamic theologian and Sufi mystic.

 

When my husband and I traveled to Turkey a few years ago, we witnessed these Whirling Dervishes practitioners at every turn in Istanbul. They were mesmerizing to watch, performing their Sama ceremony.

 

I talked to my daughter about the Whirling Dervishes and showed them photos of our travels. Afterwards we made a few of our own and we’d like to teach you how we did it. We then placed them on our lazy Susan kitchen tray and watched them turn and turn and turn.

 

Supplies

Chenille stems in white (2), red (1) & black (1)
Thread
Wire cutters
Scissors
Napkins

We started by folding the two white chenille stems in half. On one, we added a little loop and twist at the top.

We placed the non-looped stem on about where the belly would be on our person and twisted the stem up the body. Once we reached the neck area, we stopped.

We set that aside to make our tennure outfit from the square napkin by folding pleats.  This garment is  worn over a man’s undergarments and reaches from the shoulder to the ankle. When it has long sleeves, it is called an entari.

After the pleating, we also twisted our napkin.

We opened the napkin and cut a little triangle at the corner with the most folds, for our person’s head.

We also opened the napkin and cut two little slits for the arms.

We placed our person on the napkin, with the head over the opening, so we know how much of the bottom to cut off.

We opened the napkin and carefully slipped our person’s head and arms inside the openings we cut. We used the tread to tie off the waist. This will help hold the napkin in place.

Next we worked on the conical cap known as a sikke by bending our red chenille stem into a rectangle.

We then wrapped the rest of the stem around the rectangle.

So that it stays in place on our person, we wrapped a little red stem around the top of the head and folded the end back into the hat.

The final touch was adding the black chenille stem to the waist to cover up the thread. Cut off any extra with the wire cutters. This sash or belt is called a kemer.

These Whirling Dervishes were so easy to make, we added more in no time.

Be sure to stop by A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more tutorials that teach you about our Islamic world.