Air Dry Clay Ladybug {Tutorial} Plus Where? {Review}

I was recently sent the book Ayn? (Where? in Arabic) by Aya Khairy and Rania El Turk, from Maktabatee.

 

This little board book follows the story of a boy that discovers a ladybug on a head of lettuce his mom has brought home from the grocery story.  He delicately lifts it to carry but it flies away. But where is it?  Kids can lift the flaps of the next few pages to look for the ladybug, who seems to be closer than you think.

 

I took this book to a recent storytelling session and it was a huge hit. The kids loved taking turns lifting the flap and looking for the ladybug. I loved that the book was wordless so I could improvise Arabic words into the story, such as خس (khus) for lettuce, هرة (hirrah) for cat or  دعسوقة (daesuqat) or sometimes أم علي (umm ali) for ladybug.

 

For my next storytelling session, I thought it might be fun to hide a few ladybugs around the library and have the kids look for them.

 

These only took a few minutes to make but you’ll need two days for the clay to dry.  You can use regular clay and fire them in a kiln, or use air dry clay like we did.

 

Supplies

Air dry clay
Paint
Wire / wire cutters / needle nose pliers
Slicer
Pen
Bone folder
Paintbrush
E6000 / magnet

We started by carefully opening the clay so we can cut off a slice.

As soon as we were done, we put away the clay in an air tight container, to make sure it stays moist.

To get the clay ready, we spent a few minutes conditioning it. This means we rubbed it between our fingers and hands to get it soft.

After about five minutes, we divided it up into three balls and spent some time making them round.

We picked the smoothest side to each ball and flatten the other side of it so the best side showed.  Then my daughter placed it in her hand and used the bone folder to make an incision about a third of the way across. This will become the head.

Once the head is done, she placed the bone folder in the mid point and made another incision across. This creates the wings.

Once the body is done, it was time to start working on the face. My daughter took apart a ballpoint pen to use the main part for the eyes.

She then used the ink well to make the mouth.

You can choose to add antennas, or leave out the next step.  If you do decide to make them, you’ll need wire cutters and needle nose pliers to cut and shape them.

Once made, place them over the eyes in the ladybug.

We waited 24 hours for our clay to dry, then my daughter painted the body.

Once the wings had dried, she painted the face black.

She added pupils for the eyes and gave one of the three ladybugs lipstick.

The final step is to use the back of the ballpoint pen for the black spots.

You can leave your ladybug as is, or you can add a magnet with E6000. Earlier, we also added a hole in two of the ladybugs so we can add a wire to the bottom of them. We placed a tiny bit of E6000 to hold the wire.

Now our ladybugs are ready to hide. One in the corner of our magnet board in the front of the library kid’s area and the other two in the planters. Waiting to be found.

Be sure to check out the book Where from Maktabatee or ask for it a your local bookstore, library or Amazon.

Stop by these other book reviews that also include a fun craft tutorial.

Sheep Origami Bookmark

Persian Paisley Painting

 

Please visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to learn more about the Arab world.

Sheep Origami Bookmark {Tutorial} plus Who Hid The Eid Lamb {Review}

I recently received the Arabic children’s book Who Hid the Eid Lamb, written by Taghreed Najjar and illustrated by Manal Haddadin, from Maktabatee.  This company, owned by two moms, is founded with a simple objective: to hand-select high-quality, engaging, and relevant Arabic books and goods for children and beginners.

 

The story hit so close to home because the same thing happened to me as a child. You can’t image my joy at realizing I can share my experience with my daughters as I saw myself in a children’s book. Even down to the pony tail!

 

I also remember as a child falling in love with an Eid lamb that had been brought to my aunt’s home before Eid Al Adha.  While the story in the book is set in Palestine, and mine was in Libya, and the lamb in the book was white, while the one in my memory is black, the other similarities really hit close to home.

 

I remember my older cousin Ahmed had to kill the lamb for the family Eid meal and I was mad at him for days after. It’s funny how memories come rushing back from just a few images.  And the images in the book are quite stunning. We loved them all, from the detail in the Palestinian embroidery on the dresses to the tiny touches like a flower necklace on the lamb, as it frolicks in the field.

Did you notice our adorable sheep bookmark holding our place in the corner? Inspired partly by the Kaab’a bookmark we made a few days ago and the lamb from my childhood, we made it to go with our new book.

 

Supplies

Double sided tape
Scissors

Pencil
Card stock in beige, black and pink

This bookmark is in two parts, the origami bookmark that fits over the page and the cover made to look like a lamb. We started by making our bookmark first by folding a square piece of beige card stock into a triangle.

We folded the top point down.

We then folded over the points on the side of the triangle towards the point in the middle.

Finally, we tucked the side points into the pocket created by our second fold.

 

Our bookmark looked like this when it was complete. We set it aside to work on our lamb, which will cover the middle fold.

My daughter drew out a large “cloud” design on the black card stock and cut it out. She choose the word cloud because kids would get it, she said. She made it the size of our bookmark.

Next she placed the cloud over the bookmark and traced out the design. She traced it out with pencil, but if you feel confident to just cut and turn, you can try it that way too.

Now she needed to create the tuft of wool over the eyes of the lamb. She drew out a more horizontal, smaller cloud shape.

Once that was cut out, she drew and also cut an oval for the lamb face.

Finally, the ears were drawn and cut.

Now all our pieces were ready for assembly.

We added the oval face to the round black card stock and placed the ears on the sides. The top layer was the tuft of wool over the eyes.

We added the lamb’s face to the bookmark, only adding double sided tape to the top half of the body.

We made sure our cut out points matched.

Now it was time to use our pencil and draw out eyes, a nose and a mouth. We used the face from the sheep countdown printout to figure out placement.

We cut out a small triangle from pink card stock for the nose and use the double sided tape to add it on. My daughter then went over the pencil lines with a pen. She also outlined the ears and face.

Now our book mark is done and ready to hold our place.

Please stop by the Maktabee site to check out this adorable book on Eid Al Adha. It’s also available on Amazon and at your local book seller.

After I read the story to my daughter, I took it to the story time I did for Hajj at our local library and the kids there loved it also.

Shukran, Arabic for thank you, Maktabatee for this beautiful treasure that I am happy to add to my shelf of books.

If you enjoyed making this bookmark, stop by these tutorials
Moon and Star Punch Art Bookmark {Tutorial}

Eid Mubarak Punch Out Bookmark {Tutorial}

 

To make more sheep crafts, visit

Eid PomPom Sheep {Tutorial}

99 Creative Sheep Projects {Resource}

 

Make sure you visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterst for more and subscribe to our newsletter to be the first to see when our tutorial comes out.

 

 

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Mosque Golden Domes {Tutorial}

Recently Chronicle Books sent me the book Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns by Hena Khan.
This beautifully illustrated children’s book showcases Islamic culture, through the eyes of a young girl, using colors.  We learn about the red of the prayer rug, the brown in dates, the yellow of the zakat box, and so on. There is also a glossary of terms which may be unfamiliar to little ears.

 

Our favorite part of the book was it’s use of large horizontal double page art, which spreads unbordered to the edges. This allowed us to lay the book flat and talk about all the images of food, holiday preparations and architecture we see.

We especially loved the page of the golden domes on the mosques and decided to try to recreate them. To be unusual, we decided to design them from the view of those birds flying in the sky, looking down.

 

This is a great STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art Math) project because you need to use most of those resources to measure out the sizes of the domes.

 

Supplies

Decorative 12×12 paper plus 8.5×11 white card stock
Scissors
Glue
Lids of various sizes
Pen
Brown marker (optional)

Start by laying out your lids on the paper to see what you can fit. Play around with smaller lids. Mosques usually have one major dome, but sometimes several minarets and smaller domes. We went with one large dome and two smaller ones.

Cut your 12×12 paper into strips. Ours had glitter, diagonal images that left glitter all over my floor, so do this outside if your floor is not easy to sweep. We made some wider ones for the larger dome and smaller strips for the smaller domes.

Now you need to figure out long your paper strip needs to be to create a dome, turning your design from 2D to 3D. Start by folding over one end, you’ll need this later for the glue, and decide how high you want your dome to be off the paper.  Then fold the other end over, to leave another flap for the glue on the other side. Cut off any access paper.

Add glue to both flaps and place them down on the paper.

Keep adding paper, going around the sides of the dome. You’ll need to measure out each strip since each one will be different size as you build your dome up higher.

This is optional, but we decided to color the rooftop of our mosque brown.

And now our STEAM mosque domes were done and ready to be enjoyed at our dinning table tonight. My daughter will share her findings of how she created a 3D dome by measuring strips of flat paper.

 

If you enjoyed this mosque craft tutorial, please visit

Mosque Polymer Clay Cake {Tutorial}

Great Mosque of Cordoba {Printable}

Mosque Crepe Paper Banner {Tutorial}

If you enjoy reading a multicultural book and making a project on that book, please visit

Sandwich Swap Hummus {Recipe}

Persian Paisley Painting {Tutorial}

Mosque Pillow {Tutorial}

Or be sure to check out the list I’ve compiled of 99 Creative Mosque Projects.

A Crafty Arab on Pinterest has more DIY tutorials on Arab and Islamic children’s books.