12 Muslim Children Books For Father’s Day {Resource}

Father’s Day is this Sunday so I put together a list of my favorite Muslim children books to encourage great father-child interactions.

Some came from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, while a few are from American Muslims or other parts of the world were Muslims live. A couple even include grandfathers.

They make a great gift for dad, to show him how much he is appreciated. You can also send the link to your school librarian to add to their offerings that showcase Muslims in everyday life.

The titles will take you to the Amazon page to purchase them. Any money made from the affiliate sales of these books helps cover the craft supply costs of this free educational blog.

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A Balloon for Grandad by Nigel Gray (Author), Jane Ray (Illustrator)

Unhappy when he loses his silver and red balloon, Sam is comforted by imagining it on its way to visit his grandfather in Egypt.

Drummer Girl byHiba Masood (Author), Najiyah Maxfield (Editor), Hoda Hadadi (Illustrator)

Year after year, in the blessed month of Ramadan, little Najma has happily arisen to the drum beat of her neighborhood’s musaharati. He walks through the streets of her small Turkish village, waking each family for the pre-dawn meal before the long day of fasting. Najma wants nothing more than to be a musaharati herself one day, but no girl has ever taken on the role before. Her father nurtures her wishes, and encourages her to fulfill her dreams!

Bilal Cooks Daal by Aisha Saeed (Author), Anoosha Syed (Illustrator)

Six-year-old Bilal is excited to help his dad make his favorite food of all-time: daal! The slow-cooked lentil dish from South Asia requires lots of ingredients and a whole lot of waiting. Bilal wants to introduce his friends to daal. They’ve never tried it! As the day goes on, the daal continues to simmer, and more kids join Bilal and his family, waiting to try the tasty dish. And as time passes, Bilal begins to wonder: Will his friends like it as much as he does?

The Butter Man by Elizabeth Letts (Author), Ali Alalou (Author), Julie Klear Essakalli (Illustrator)

While Nora waits impatiently for dinner, her father stirs up a story from his childhood. During a famine Nora’s grandfather must travel over the mountain to find work so he can provide food for his family. While young Ali waits for his father’s return, he learns a lesson of patience, perseverance, and hope.

Clever Ali by Nancy Farmer (Author), Gail De Marcke (Illustrator)

Ali is finally old enough to join his father in tending pigeons for the evil Sultan of Cairo. The boy is given a pet pigeon, but warned NEVER to feed it too much, lest it become spoiled and lazy. But Ali feels sorry for his hungry pet and disobeys. When the overfed bird becomes greedy and ruins a plate of the Sultan’s cherries, Ali is in big trouble! Now he has only three days to replace the Sultan’s 600 cherries from the snowy mountains of Syria. Only then can he save his father from the dreaded Oubliette: a deep pit where a giant demon is waiting!

The Hundredth Name by Shulamith Levey Oppenheim (Author), Michael Hays (Illustrator)

This picture book for young readers about family, friendship and faith is rich in the details of Middle Eastern village life. It tells the warm story of a bond between a father, a son, and the son’s favorite camel, as well as their devotion to the Muslim faith, and the power of prayer in their daily life.

Ibrahim by Francesc d’A Sales (Author), Eulalia Sariola (Illustrator)

It’s a big day for Ibrahim when he starts work at his father’s stall in the market place of Marrekesh. The market is alive with bright colors and the cries of vendors. Ibrahim is excited not only to be a part of all the bustling activty, but also to be entering the world of grown-ups.

The Little Green Drum by Taghreed Najjar (Author). Hassan Manasrah (Illustrator)

Samia’s father has a very important job. He is the Dawn Waker-Upper for the whole village, during the holy month of Ramadan. But one year, just before Ramadan, her father is not very well. Can Samia take his place as the Waker Upper?

My Dad’s Beard by Zanib Mian (Author), Laura Ewing (Illustrator)

An adorable little character shows us how much he admires his dad by sharing amusing observations and heartfelt sentiments of his beard, and why he and the others love it! A warm and loving family. A perfect picture book to read aloud, or for small children to read to themselves time and time again.

My Father’s Shop by Satomi Ichikawa

Mustafa loves a particular rug in his father’s shop. It has a hole in it, so he can put it over his head and still see out. His father wants to teach his son some foreign languages, but Mustafa runs off to the bustling Moroccan market instead (with his favourite rug on his head). There he finds a different way of learning other languages – and of getting tourists to his father’s shop.  

My Grandfather’s Masbaha by Susan Daniel Fayad (Author), Avery Liell-Kok (Illustrator)

One summer day at his grandparents’ home in Lebanon, Adam gets upset after his friends leave after a play date. His grandfather (Jidoo Yousef) helps him realize how much he has. By using the masbaha (a string of beads) he learns how to count his blessings.

Yo Soy Muslim: A Father’s Letter to His Daughter by Mark Gonzales, Mehrdokht Amini (Illustrations)

Written as a letter from a father to his daughter, Yo Soy Muslim is a celebration of social harmony and multicultural identities. The vivid and elegant verse, accompanied by magical and vibrant illustrations, highlights the diversity of the Muslim community as well as Indigenous identity. A literary journey of discovery and wonder, Yo Soy Muslim is sure to inspire adults and children alike.

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Stop by A Crafty Arab’s educational page to see more book lists, like these

99 Muslim Children Books

99 Ramadan Children Books

Be sure to visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see other book lists, reviews and tutorials that teach about Muslim culture or the Arab world.

Refugee Popup Bookstore {Outing}

This weekend, I am opening a refugee pop-up bookstore, SCM Souk, to help a local Seattle nonprofit humanitarian organization acquire more income to run its programs.

Souk /سوق is the Arabic word for store, originally started as an idea to provide the Salaam Cultural Museum with a way to support refugees.

Salaam Cultural Museum (SCM) is a charitable non-profit organization originally formed in February 1996 to gather and publish information on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and to promote understanding of the people, cultures, languages, religions, and lands of this region. For the last several years they have been collecting and distributing humanitarian aid and coordinating SCM Medical Missions to the region.

SCM Medical Missions not only sends doctors, nurses and humanitarian relief to the Zaatari Refugee Camp, the second largest in the world, but it also sends medical equipment, clothing, menstrual pads, shoes, quilts, school supplies and sports equipment. All these are proved free of charge to refugees.

I got involved with SCM Medical Missions when I found out that 100% of all the money donated goes to these programs. They have zero overhead, zero staff salaries, zero administration fees. Everything is volunteer and their accounting books are open for anyone to look over. They have grant writers to help find funds to cover operating costs and donors that cover the fees for the containers SCM fills with donated items.

A few months ago, one of the SCM board members offered space in Bellevue, Washington, across the street from Bellevue Park, to sell a few items, such as books and jewelry made by the refugee women in the SCM run educational and sewing training centers.

I offered to help get the souk started, since I had already helped set up a similar retail space for them in Seattle. For the past month, my family and I have been painting, building, and cleaning a 200 foot room to turn it into a second souk for SCM.

My daughters have given up their past weekends to helping paint. All the paint was donated.

Meanwhile, my husband built a custom cover for the pipes that were exposed. All the wood, nails and drywall were also donated.

We will be selling the beautiful handmade jewelry, along with traditional embroidered dresses and children’s literature that focus on refugees, diversity and marginalized people. I have been contacting publishers & authors to fill the shelves with diverse books. I decorated the souk’s front doors with the types of books I was searching for, while the mess was going on inside..

We will have the space for five weeks, but plan to take full advantage of it by celebrating Women’s History Month with activities each Saturday.

We will begin with a story time reading of a book, then followed by a free craft to take home.

Please help SCM Souk grow by liking the Facebook page. It will help you keep track of where we will be next month.


24 #BlackHistoryMonth Black and Muslim Children’s Books {Resource}

This list of 24 children’s books was created to celebrate Black Muslim authors and protagonists for February’s Black History Month.

The Pew Research Center estimates the total populations of Muslims in the United States at 2.35 million, with Black/African-American Muslims making up 20% of that population. Some have ancestral ties as turn of the century slaves stolen from West/Central Africa, or others have converted in the recent centuries.

In American history, Malcolm X is considered the first person to start the movement among African Americans towards mainstream Islam, after he made the pilgrimage to Mecca, in Saudi Arabia.

I’ve already compiled a list of Malcolm X books, so I thought I’d gather a list of other books written about and/or by Black Muslims in America, for children.

This blog post is part of the fifth annual Black History Month Blog Hop from Multicultural Kids Blog. This event brings together various blogs from around the world to explore the rich history and cultures of Africa and the African diaspora.

Please visit the other blogs at the bottom of this post for more educational posts about this important month in our calendar.

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Nanni’s Hijab by Khadijah Abdul-Haqq

Adam To Zamzam And Fun In The Sun by Jamila Alqarnain & Karimah Alhark

Fun in the Sun by Jamila Alqarnain & Karimah Alhark            

Hind’s Hands: A Story about Autism by Jamila Alqarnain & Karimah Alhark    

Princess And The Good Deed, The by Jamila Alqarnain & Karimah Alhark      

Rasheed’s Deeds by Jamila Alqarnain & Karimah Alhark            

Yak in the Back by Jamila Alqarnain & Karimah Alhark           

Not Quite Snow White by Ashley Franklin

Hannah Habibi Learns About Modesty by Janette Grant

Sameerah’s Hijab: and the first day of school by Janette Grant

Beauty Of My Hijab by Fatimah Ashaela Moore Ibrahim

Proudest Blue: A Story of Hijab and Family, The by Ibtihaj Muhammad

Bashirah and The Amazing Bean Pie Ameenah Muhammad-Diggins

Ngozi’s Little Brown Princess Tea Party by Asiyah Muhsin-Thomas

Sadiq and the Desert Star by Nuurali. Siman          

Little Brother for Sale by Rahma Rodaah    

Muhiima’s Quest by Rahma Rodaah,         

Wahid and His Special Friend by Robyn Saleem-Abdusamad   

You Are Beautiful by Robyn Saleem-Abdusamad 

Zaynab’s Enchanted Scarf      Robyn Saleem-Abdusamad  

Betty Before X by Ilyasah Shabazz        

Malcolm Little by Ilyasah Shabazz        

Silly Monkey by Rhoda Sye

Mommy’s Khimar by Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow        

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Black History Month on Multicultural Kid Blogs

Welcome to our fifth annual Black History Month Blog Hop, where together we explore the rich history and cultures of Africa and the African diaspora.

You can also follow our Black History board on Pinterest:

Participating Blogs

Creative World of Varya on Multicultural Kid Blogs: Black History Month – How It Matters to Us

A Crafty Arab: 24 Black and Muslim Children’s Books

Growing Up Gupta: 10 Interesting Facts About Shirley Chisholm

Great Family Reads: Books About Black Leaders in History for Kids

Mama Smiles: Black History Month Facts and Printable Timeline

Mommy Evolution: African American Toddler Books

Crafty Moms Share: Black Inventors