Seattle Arab Cultural Camp {Resource}

I have decided to create an Arab Cultural Camp for children in Washington.

 

After spending years working at various children’s camps around the Puget Sound, starting with StarTalk in Seattle and recently at Girl Scout Rainbow Camp on the Eastside, I wanted to create a camp that would specifically focus on the culture and heritage of the Arab world.

 

I have used the resources from A Crafty Arab, combined with my eleven year’s experience as an art docent at my daughters’ school, to create eight, fun, educational, camp stations.  These art lesson stations include themes about Arab hospitality, Arab countries, Arab literature, Arab traditional instruments, Arab spices, etc.

 

It will be held August 6-10 in my artist studio in Redmond and August 20-24 at Salaam Cultural Museum in Seattle.

 

Since this is our inaugural year, the camp will be limited to 15 participants on a first come, first served basis.  I will be taking children enterting grades K-6 from 8:30am to 3:30pm Monday through Friday, with a special outing and gallery show planned for our final day. Camp will be $200 a week to cover materials and visiting artists fees. There will be an open house for interested parents, to check out the studio and experience a sample art stations, on July 28th.

 

Arab Cultural Camp Sample Day

Our Arab Cultural Camp day will start with a Arabic story time/ song/ reading activity. My studio library includes hundreds of crafts and Arab children books. The children will be able to check out any of the books at the end of the day for enjoyment at home with siblings or other family members.

 

The children will then be separated for age appropriate stations. These included painting, cooking, calligraphy, dabke, etc before a break for lunch.

 

The children will enjoy a lunch from home, or a nutritious option can be provided for an additional fee paid that morning, before beginning a second set of stations.

 

Our day will finish with another story time / song / reading activity before the children are picked up.  If daycare hours are needed, please let me know.

 

We will have one day when a local Arab musician will come to teach the children how to play the darbuka for an all camp singalong, I am still working the details on which day. Our Friday will also be a little different as it will include an art outing, followed by a gallery show of all the children’s artwork.

 

Yalla, let’s do this, I’m in!

If you are interested in learning more about the Arab Cultural Camp, either contact me or fill out an Arab Cultural Camp Application.

 

If this year’s Arab Cultural Camp is a success, I have also submitted a City of Seattle Youth Arts grant to offer it for free to refugee children next year. If you would like to be involved in that endeavor, please let me know as I hope to make it a much larger scale project and will be grateful for a few helping hands.

Nakba Key Charm {Tutorial}

We are making a gift for our Ramadan craft today for a dear friend who is from Palestine.  We will give it to her at our upcoming Eid Al Fitr celebration.

 

Eid Al Fitr is the three day holiday that follows the holy month of Ramadan.

 

The charm is a key inside a frame.  This symbolizes the nakba, or the Palestinian’s 1948 exodus from their country.  Many Palestinians left with the key to their home around their neck, in the hopes of returning someday.

 

I received the mod melts as my role as Plaid Ambassador.  You can add any type of necklace you would like at the end.

 

Supplies

Mod melts
Melt forms – frame and steampunk
Pliers
Hot glue gun
Awl
Oval rings

My daughter picked the gold mod melt color from all the different choices, added it to the hot glue gun and waited for it to heat up.  Once it was at the correct temperature, she filled the small key mold.

She also made a small frame mold.  She waited a few minutes and popped them out of the mold.  She added a tiny bit of hot glue to the back of the frame to attach the key. She used the awl to poke a hole in the top of both charms.

My daughter inserted an oval ring into the hole she just created. She added a necklace before she closed it with the pliers.

Now the charm was done.

If you enjoyed making this necklace accessory, visit

Eid Origami Star Necklace {Tutorial}

Coin Felt Necklace {Tutorial}

 

Stop by A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more DIY craft tutorials

Fez K-Cup Headband {Tutorial}

The fez is a headdress, usually made of felt, that is worn in formal and informal occasions in the Mediterranean area of the world.

 

Sometimes in the northern regions, such as Greece or Cyprus, it was worn by woman, but the southern countries, it is primarily on the top of men’s heads. In some areas of North Africa, it could be different colors, including red, black or white.

 

As a child, I remember my father wearing a black fez, with a black, thick tassel, in Libya during the holiday seasons when he worn a traditional outfit. However, while we were in Morocco this past summer, I noticed that the shops in Fez sold mostly red hats.

 

I spent some time with one of the shop keepers learning about the history of these fascinating hats. I learned they were used in the Ottoman area by the military and while they were banned in some areas, others in fraternal organizations use them with pride.

 

While cleaning out my studio for Earth Day this past weekend, I came across an extra K-cup favor that had been left over from our past craft. Instead of throwing it away, we used it on a headband to celebrate these special hats.

 

Now it will go in the pretend trunk for many more afternoons of play.  All the directions to make the fez hat are here and you’ll also need these items to make the headband.

 

Supplies

Felt with glue backing
Fez favor
Pen
Scissors
Headband

Place the Kcup over the felt and trace it out.

Cut out the circle from the felt.

Remove the backing from the felt and add it to the underside of the headband.  Add the fez hat favor to the top.

Now your fez headband is ready for wear.

To check out other fez hats we recycled out of a party cup, be sure to check out our fez party hat.

Visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to learn more about the Arab world.