Qatar Flag Bookmark {Tutorial}

Day 29 of our Ramadan crafts challenge was spent talking about the country of Qatar.

Now seemed like a great time to continue our quest to learn about all the different countries in the Arab League. We settled on Qatar, which became a member in 1971.

Qatar (Arabic: قطر‎‎) is located in Western Asia, on the northeastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula. It is boarded by Saudi Arabia to the south and surrounded by the Persian Gulf.

The capital is Doha and a popular tourist spot is the Khor al Adaid (“Inland Sea”), an area of rolling sand dunes.  To see other stunning spots visit Qatar the beautiful.

The flag of Qatar is maroon with a broad white serrated band (nine white points) on the hoist side. It was adopted on September 3, 1971 and is the only national flag having a width more than twice its height.

The shade of Qatar’s colored portion is referred to as ‘Qatar maroon’. The history of purple dye in the country dates back several centuries. The white portion of the flag symbolizes the peace procured from signing anti-piracy treaties with the British.

We made the flag into a bookmark by sewing rick rack onto a piece of felt.

 

Supplies

Rick Rack
Felt
Thread and sewing machine
Scissors

We know that the flag has 9 white points, so we made our white rick rack a little longer for the overage and then cut it off. We then cut the felt fabric to the size of the nine points.

We sewed two rows of  white rick rack and then added the red.

We folded over the extra overhang and sewed the edge clean, cutting off any extra fabric.

Now our bookmark is ready to hold our place in one of our favorite books!

 

If you enjoyed learning about the Arab world, be sure to visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterst.

 

2017 Ramadan Crafts Challenge Save The Date {Resource}

Ramadan 2017 / 1438 is just a few short days away.  And with it comes our 7th annual Crafty Ramadan 30 day Challenge.

 

30 days – 30 crafts.

 

We have been researching, experimenting and adjusting projects from our local library, in our kitchen and at the studio. We can’t wait to share them with you.

 

If you are new to Ramadan, Islam or the Arab world, we hope you learn something new.  If you are here to find entertainment for your kids, we hope they have fun expanding their world.

 

Please visit our 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 Ramadan crafts.  Or follow A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see craft DIY tutorials, book lists and downloads we create all year long.

 

xxx

 

This post was part of Ramadan Blog Hop with some of my fellow MKB bloggers. Check out some more posts:
Ramadan for Kids 2016 | Multicultural Kid Blogs

Multicultural Kid Blogs is proud to be hosting its third annual Ramadan for Kids blog hop, where bloggers come together to share ideas for teaching kids about and honoring Ramadan. Don’t forget to check out our blog hops from last year and 2015. Be sure to follow our Ramadan board on Pinterest for even more ideas and link up your own posts below!

Participating Blogs

Pint Size Gourmets on Multicultural Kid Blogs
ACraftyArab
Family In Finland
Jeddah Mom
Middle Way Mom: All Things Ramadan
Sand in My Toes



Ramadan Kareem!

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Egyptian Ful Medames {Recipe}

My book club met to discuss an Egyptian book, so I decided to make an Egyptian dish, ful medames.

 

Ful medames is a meal of cooked fava beans dating back to Ancient Egypt then exported to other parts of the Arab world, such as Djibouti, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

 

It seemed the perfect accompaniment to our lively discussion of banned book, War in the Land of Egypt by Yusuf Al Qa’id to commemorate Arab American Heritage Month.
The book was difficult to read at times due to it’s too close to home subject matter, but unanimously loved by everyone. Right away it was noted that, despite it being written about the eve of the 1973 October war, it was very timely due to our current politically nepotism.  It showcases a case of the privileges bestowed upon those with money and power.  From Amazon review:

This book tells the story of Masri (the only character with a name), a young Egyptian peasant who is sent into the Egyptian army on the eve of the 1973 Yom Kippur war in place of a rich man’s son. Al-Qa’id tells his tale from several different perspectives: that of the village headman (the Umda) whose son Masri will replace; the broker who finds Masri; the hapless young man’s father; his friend; his commanding officer; and finally, the investigator sent to look into the switch. The one character we do not hear from is Masri.

It soon becomes apparent why this book was banned in Egypt, as Al-Qa’id uses the events surrounding the war to indict the bureaucratic corruption and social inequality rife in his country. Each character represents a different facet of Egyptian society with Masri himself, by virtue of his name (which, in Arabic, translates as “Egyptian”), standing for Everyman. Political this novel doubtless is, but it is also a masterfully crafted piece of fiction and a genuine page-turner as well. –Alix Wilber

 

The ful medames was also a hit and everyone helped themselves to seconds, which to an Arab is the highest compliment.  I had never made ful before but had eaten it hundreds of times growing up. It was my father’s favorite meal and simple one he mastered When my mother was at school studying for her PhD, he would make it for us. All. The. Time.  I got so sick of it that I never ate it again once I left home for college.

 

But because it’s such a staple known Egyptian food, it would have been wrong to serve anything else with such an adumbrate political book.

 

Ingredients

Fava beans
Garlic
Cumin
Olive oil
Tomatoes (optional)
Boiled eggs (optional)
Feta cheese (optional)

 

Add the fava beans, cumin and garlic in a pot with a cup of water and let it boil. You can buy the beans whole or cheat and buy them canned (in which case, just use the water from the can).

Lower the temperature to simmer and let sit for two hours, stirring occasionally. The beans are cooked until very soft.  In ancient times, the ful was left simmering in large copper jars throughout the night, to be served from the next morning.

While the beans are cooking, chop up the tomatoes, boil the eggs and crumble the cheese. Place all in separate bowls with spoons to have available for toppings.

 

Once your ful is ready, Scoop it up in bowls, top with olive oil and pass on to family and friends to pick their own individualized toppings.

Enjoy with a side of couscous with grilled veggies.

 

We ended our evening with a healthy dessert of halwa and fig crackers.  Please stop by A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more recipes from the Arab world.

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