Arabic Mother’s Day Card {Tutorial}

Mother’s day will be celebrated in the Arab world on March 21st, 2018 by 19 countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).


The first Mother’s Day was started in Egypt in 1956 after two journalists received numerous letters complaining from mothers that their children do not take care of them. The writers, Mostafa Amin and Ali Amin, suggested that mothers be honored on the first day of spring, March 21st, and the tradition spread to other parts of the Arab world.


In some parts of the MENA region, the day now includes grandmothers and mother in laws, evolving into Family Day.


In Arabic, mama is ماما and today’s tutorial includes making a card with flowers written out in the form of that word.



Color card stock
Flower punch
Double sided tape
Foam squares

To start, punch out the same flower shape from different colors of card stock.

Once you make eight or nine of each color, add a little detail by drawing some ovals into the petals.

Once all the flowers were done, curl the edges of some of them with the end of the pen.

Play around with the flowers until you make sure you have enough for the word. Then place double sided tape on the flowers that were curled and foam squared under the flowers that stayed flat, before adding them to the card.

Keep alternating, the low, curled flower, with the high, flat flower, until the word is done. If you find the image off in numbers, it’s very easy to make an extra flower.

If you have to mail your card, make sure you place it in a padded envelope to help keep the flowers from getting destroyed.

Your mom may also choose to place your card in a frame, which we all know means you are her favorite child.

To make more cards, visit these other tutorials

Arabic Stamped Thank You Card {Tutorial}

Eid Step Card {Tutorial}

Stop by A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more DIY crafts that teach about the Arab world.

13 Activities to Cheer on Arab Winter Athletes {Resource}

The 2018 Winter Olympics will be starting next week on February 9th, 2018 in Pyeongchang County, South Korea.  This year, two Arab countries, Lebanon and Morocco, will be participating.


At the last Summer Olympics, I put together a list of activities to do to cheer on the Arab athletes and thought it might be nice to do the same for the winter athletes.


I’ve compiled a few from my own site and added some others from my fellow bloggers.


Sports 2 * Athletes 3

Lebanese Cedar Bead Tree {Tutorial}
Lebanese Flag Candle {Tutorial}
Lebanese Lentil Soup {Recipe}
Lebanese Meghli {Recipe}
Lebanon Rocks {Tutorial}


Sports 2 * Athletes 2

Moroccan Beef Tagine with green couscous
Moroccan Chicken Stew with Honey & Apricots
Morocco Flag Candy Dish {Tutorial}
Morrocan Leg of Lamb
Moroccan Mint Tea
Moroccan Recipe: Bread or Khobz
Morocco Rocks {Tutorial}
Morocco Sweet Stew {Recipe}


Visit these other posts from my sisters at Muslimah Bloggers who also wrote about activities that can be done to get ready for the Winter Olympics.

Olympic Games Crafts for Kids from Multicultural Motherhood
Winter Olympics Activities from Alizeh My Soul


Be sure to visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more activities about the Arab world.

Best of A Crafty Arab 2017 {Resource}

A Crafty Arab has had an active 2017, teaching children and adults about the Arab world.


In 2017, there were 99 Arab  posts written (100 if you count this one) and of those, 67 were DIY craft tutorials, 7 were free printables and 7 were food related.


The rest of the list is made up of 10 posts the included educational resources and the number I’m most proud of: 8 posts that were related to Arab or Muslim children’s books, either as reviews or book lists.


Here are the top 5 posts, with the most amount of traffic. for 2017.


Not surprising, the top post (almost double in traffic compared to the next post) was tied to the United States election.  Late last year, Americas elected a white supremacist sympathizer president and one of his despicable first acts was to ask for an immediate ban on all Muslims that enter America from seven countries.  I decided to use this opportunity to educate about Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen by compiling them in one post.

The second highest post was also a compilation post full of Arab and/or Islamic activities, this time listing all 30 DIY projects created for each day of Ramadan.  It’s excited to see that the 30 day Ramadan Crafts Challenge is now 7 years old and one of the most popular events on the blog.  Ramadan activities included an advent calendar, rewards, games, artwork and giving. Check out all 30 Ramadan crafts, downloads and recipes on this post.

The third highest post was a book review and a STEM tutorial about building mosque domes.  I was recently sent Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns by Hena Khan to review.  As a co-Host of the Multicultural Children’s Book Day, I’m always looking for books to add to our diverse shelf.  Be on the lookout in 2018 for another book plus tutorial because I was lucky enough to be sent more than one book. In the meantime, check out our Mosque Golden Domes post.

The fourth highest post was a free printable Eid banner.  We love to make banners here on the blog because they are so easy, take very little time to create and instantly makes any room festive.  Five years ago, I made an entire Eid party set and last year I asked my online community for color options (having already creating the banner in teal).  Salmon was a hit with everyone and now that download is free Happy Eid Salmon printable.

Rounding off the list is a tutorial that teaches about the five pillars of Islam.  To be honest, this was a surprise for me.  As a paper artist, I do tend to make more paper art with my kids and was sure a paper tutorial would make the list.  But instead craft sticks sneaked in as one of the top material of choose for my readers.  This super easy and quick craft is a wonderful way to teach the 5 pillars without a lot of supplies or mess and can be found here.


Other highlights of the year include becoming a Plaid Ambassador and being asked to teach, for the sixth year in a row, at a women’s retreat. Holidays celebrated included Persian Nowruz and Arab American Heritage Month. I introduced my readers to Mariam al-Astrulabi, plus 99 Arab American Women who they should know (and most already did).


InshaAllah (An Arabic term used by both Christians and Muslims that means ‘God willing’), my daughters and I look forward to 2018 being another great year. We hope to bring you more educational posts that you can use with your children or students.  As an teacher, nothing brings me greater joy then sharing my culture in a positive way.  Shurkan (Arabic for thank you) for following along on the journey.


Please make sure you sign up for the A Crafty Arab newsletter to find out when future posts are out. Stop by my Arabic, Perisan and Urdu handmade store to purchase a unique, one of a kind card, or add a fun Arabic educational poster to any child’s life.


Stop by these other Muslimah Bloggers to see which posts made their top 5 list:

Afreen’s Kitchen
By Shahira
Ilm Student Central
Ilma Education
Multicultural Motherhood
The Imperfect Muslimah
The Lady of the House
Umm Afraz Muhammed Blog


Visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more.