2nd Annual Seattle Arab Cultural Camp {Outing}

Do to popular demand, I have decided to bring back the Seattle Arab Cultural Camp this summer.

The mission is to spend some time creating the art projects from this blog that educate about the Arab culture.

We will discuss language, food, music, artists, dress, holidays, etc, to learn more about the 22 countries that make up the Arab world in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

By spending a week looking at the MENA area, we hope this opens children’s eyes into seeing more about that culture.

It will be held in the Seattle suburb of Redmond the week of July 15 to July 19, 2019. We will start our day at 8:30am and pick up will be at 3:30pm. Extended hours available.

Kids will stop mid day for an exercise and lunch break and each day will include a service project to give back to the community.

I am still working out the final schedule, but it will be very similar to last year’s camp, which can be found here.

The camp will once again be limited to 15 participants on a first come, first served basis.  I will be taking children entering grades 1-6. Camp will be $200 a week to cover materials and visiting artists fees.

There will be an open house for interested parents, to check out the studio and experience a sample art stations, on June 22th.

If you are interested in learning more about the Arab Cultural Camp, either contact me or fill out an

If you would like to be involved in camp, please let me know as I will be grateful for a few helping hands to turn this into a larger scale project.

Kofta Crescent Ring {Recipe}

Our family had friends over for dinner recently and I made kofta, a meatball type dish, commonly eaten from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. To make my kofta a little more unusual, I placed it into pre-made crescent rolls shaped into a ring.

In Morocco, kofta is made in a tagine, while in Libya and Egypt, kofta might be shaped into cigar or finger sizes that can easily fit into sandwiches. Some in the Levent region, like Jordon or Palestine, might make kofta flattened into a tray or made into patties.

I have seen the crescent rings made before, from taco crescent rings to french dip crescent rings, but I had never seen one made from kofta.

I will have to admit the photos below are of our family’s second attempt. The first try tasted just the same, but did not look pretty. I figured out the secret and want to share it with you so you’ll enjoy this yummy dish at home too.

Ingredients

  • 2lbs ground beef
  • 1egg
  • 1cup bread crums
  • 3 or 4 cloves garlic
  • 1tsp sald
  • 2 1/2tsp ground sumac
  • 2tsp ground cumin
  • 1 1/2tsp red peper flakes
  • 1 1/2tsp paprika
  • 2 packages of Pillsbury Crescents

I started by getting the ring ready first. I placed all the crescent rolls in a circle, making sure the bottoms overlapped, with the points facing out.

Slice the garlic cloves and place them, along with all the other ingredients, into one bowl. Wash your hands and use them to mix everything. Kids love to do this part, so let them at it.

After everything is well mixed, shape the meat mixture into a circle on the crescent rolls.

Here is where I messed up on my first try, make sure the tips of the crescent rolls are tucked under. Bake at 350 for 30-35 minutes and your kofta crescent ring is ready to enjoy.

Let the kofta cool a little before cutting into it, but the lines of the rolls make it easy to size portions.

Our dinner table also included Moroccan stew, tabouleh, and pasta salad, along with a few other sides.

Be sure to stop by these other kid friendly foods from the MENA region

Eid Sprinkle Marshmallow Pops {Tutorial}

Sandwich Swap {Book Review} plus Hummus {Recipe}

Visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more posts about the Arab world & Muslim culture.


Moon Cupcake Toppers {Recipe}

We had such a great time making these mini Oreo, easy moon cupcake toppers this past weekend.

 

I found the mini Oreo cookie bag in our grocery store check out aisle and had the idea right away that they would make adorable mini moons.

 

We love making crafts that focus on the moon since it’s such a big part of the Islamic calendar. It helps determine when Ramadan starts and when Eid is celebrated.

 

We have so many moon crafts, that I’ve compiled them into a list of 99, so be sure to check it out.

99 creative arabic craft moon projects

For this yummy treat to happen, gather these few items.  The goal is to make more Oreo toppers for the cupcakes than to eat them. Sadly we had a lot of broken pieces in our bag that could not be used as toppers and had to be sacrificed.  So I’d recommend buying two bags if you are trying this out.

 

Supplies

Mini Oreos
Spreading knife
Cupcake {Home made}
Toothpicks
Sprinkles
Frosting
Plate

Our toothpicks had a pointy end and a flat end, so we used the pointy end for the cookie and the flat end went into the cupcake.  Hold the Oreo firmly in your fingers when you insert the toothpick as the inside of the cookie is very soft. Place the finished Oreos on a plate.

We settled on making just five of the moon phases, to look similar to our Ramadan Chalkboard String Art. We used it as a guide to decorate the Oreo cookies with the frosting.

Once the cookies were done, we added the sprinkles for texture to look like the dark spots of the moon.  We also picked up the Oreo cookies and gently pressed the frosted side into the sprinkles that had fallen on the plate to pick up extras.

Our moon phases cupcake toppers are done and ready to be placed into the cupcakes.  Put them all on one, or spread them out.  Again, try not to eat them before the party. It’s very hard!

If you’d like to make more party treats, check out these other simple crafts

BaklaWa Pops {Recipe}

Ramadan Man’ousheh Mini Bites {Recipe}

 

Visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more tutorials that teach about Islam or the Muslim world.

Enjoy these moon books that teach about it’s importance during Ramadan: