Arab World Teachers Pay Teachers {Resource}

Due to some encouragement, I have decided to start selling my Arab world educational resources on Teachers Pay Teachers.

My first selling product I decided to make was a set of 12 quotes by Arab American women, many of them listed on my 99 Arab American Women Resource post.

These include:

  • Manal Al-Sharif is a women’s rights activist.
  • Cherien Dabis is an actress, director, producer, and screenwriter.
  • Mona Eltahawy is a freelance journalist, and social commentator.
  • Deana Haggag is an arts administrator.
  • Suheir Hammad is a poet, author, performer, and political activist.
  • Hoda Kotb is a broadcast journalist, television personality, and author.
  • Christa McAuliffe was a teacher and astronaut.
  • Naomi Shihab Nye is a poet, songwriter, and novelist
  • Ilhan Omar is a politician and social activist.
  • Marlo Thomas is an actress, producer, author, and social activist.
  • Helen Thomas was a reporter and author.
  • Maysoon Zayid is an actress and comedian.

A sample of one of the quotes:

I hope to have a few more Arab world educational resources up before April’s Arab Heritage Month.

My shop previously only held one free product, my Ramadan countdown lantern:

Please be sure to Follow my “new” ACraftyArab Teachers Pay Teachers Shop as it starts to get some attention from me.

Kofta Crescent Ring {Recipe}

Our family had friends over for dinner recently and I made kofta, a meatball type dish, commonly eaten from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. To make my kofta a little more unusual, I placed it into pre-made crescent rolls shaped into a ring.

In Morocco, kofta is made in a tagine, while in Libya and Egypt, kofta might be shaped into cigar or finger sizes that can easily fit into sandwiches. Some in the Levent region, like Jordon or Palestine, might make kofta flattened into a tray or made into patties.

I have seen the crescent rings made before, from taco crescent rings to french dip crescent rings, but I had never seen one made from kofta.

I will have to admit the photos below are of our family’s second attempt. The first try tasted just the same, but did not look pretty. I figured out the secret and want to share it with you so you’ll enjoy this yummy dish at home too.

Ingredients

  • 2lbs ground beef
  • 1egg
  • 1cup bread crums
  • 3 or 4 cloves garlic
  • 1tsp sald
  • 2 1/2tsp ground sumac
  • 2tsp ground cumin
  • 1 1/2tsp red peper flakes
  • 1 1/2tsp paprika
  • 2 packages of Pillsbury Crescents

I started by getting the ring ready first. I placed all the crescent rolls in a circle, making sure the bottoms overlapped, with the points facing out.

Slice the garlic cloves and place them, along with all the other ingredients, into one bowl. Wash your hands and use them to mix everything. Kids love to do this part, so let them at it.

After everything is well mixed, shape the meat mixture into a circle on the crescent rolls.

Here is where I messed up on my first try, make sure the tips of the crescent rolls are tucked under. Bake at 350 for 30-35 minutes and your kofta crescent ring is ready to enjoy.

Let the kofta cool a little before cutting into it, but the lines of the rolls make it easy to size portions.

Our dinner table also included Moroccan stew, tabouleh, and pasta salad, along with a few other sides.

Be sure to stop by these other kid friendly foods from the MENA region

Eid Sprinkle Marshmallow Pops {Tutorial}

Sandwich Swap {Book Review} plus Hummus {Recipe}

Visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more posts about the Arab world & Muslim culture.


Arab Homemade Hummus {Recipe} Plus {Review}

We made this home made hummus recipe to celebrate Happy Valentine’s Day! For those that don’t observe today, then Happy International Book Giving Day!

The mission of book giving day is to get books into the hands of as many children as possible. To help celebrate, my daughter gifted one of her favorite books, The Sandwich Swap by Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah, to a new friend at school. She had just moved to the area and didn’t have any books in her room yet.

This delightful book tells the story of two best friends, Salma and Lily, who share so many things in common. Except for lunch.

Lily eats a peanut butter and jelly sandwiche while Salma eats a hummus and pita sandwich. Soon the entire school is involved in their lunch lesson of friendship, love and tolerance.

In the book, Salma’s mother makes her the sandwiches every morning for lunch and I told my daughter that I remember my own doing the same.  We realized that we wanted to gift the sandwich book with some homemade hummus. We then spent the afternoon putting our book and hummus welcoming present together.

Supplies

1/3 cup Lemon juice
1/2 cup Olive oil
Olives for garnish
1/4 cup Tahini
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon paprika or pepper
3 cloves garlic
1 can chickpeas or 2 cups dried chickpeas*

*Hummus is the Arabic world for mashed chickpeas. If you are buying your chickpeas in the can, they are ready to be used, simply drain them. If you buy your chickpeas dry, you will need to bring them to boil then simmer about 1/2 hour until tender.

Combine all ingredients into a food processor and mix until the consistency is smooth. I sometimes sneak in a teaspoon of cayenne if no one is looking for an extra kick.

Place in dish and add a teaspoon of olive oil.  Place a few olives on top for garnish and enjoy with a side of pita chips.  Or add in pita bread as a sandwich.

If you enjoyed this hummus recipe, be sure to visit other Arab food recipes on A Crafty Arab on Pinterst.

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