2017 Ramadan Crafts Challenge Save The Date {Resource}

Ramadan 2017 / 1438 is just a few short days away.  And with it comes our 7th annual Crafty Ramadan 30 day Challenge.

 

30 days – 30 crafts.

 

We have been researching, experimenting and adjusting projects from our local library, in our kitchen and at the studio. We can’t wait to share them with you.

 

If you are new to Ramadan, Islam or the Arab world, we hope you learn something new.  If you are here to find entertainment for your kids, we hope they have fun expanding their world.

 

Please visit our 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 Ramadan crafts.  Or follow A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see craft DIY tutorials, book lists and downloads we create all year long.

 

xxx

 

This post was part of Ramadan Blog Hop with some of my fellow MKB bloggers. Check out some more posts:
Ramadan for Kids 2016 | Multicultural Kid Blogs

Multicultural Kid Blogs is proud to be hosting its third annual Ramadan for Kids blog hop, where bloggers come together to share ideas for teaching kids about and honoring Ramadan. Don’t forget to check out our blog hops from last year and 2015. Be sure to follow our Ramadan board on Pinterest for even more ideas and link up your own posts below!

Participating Blogs

Pint Size Gourmets on Multicultural Kid Blogs
ACraftyArab
Family In Finland
Jeddah Mom
Middle Way Mom: All Things Ramadan
Sand in My Toes



Ramadan Kareem!

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Mauritania Flag Banner {Tutorial}

Arab American Heritage Month seems like a great time to continue our quest to learn about all the different countries in the Arab League. We settled on Mauritania, which became a member in 1973.

 

Mauritania (Arabic: موريتانيا) is located in the Maghreb region of Africa.  It is boarded  by Morocco/Western Sahara to the north, Algeria in the northeast, Mali in the east/southeast, Senegal to the southwest and the Atlantic Ocean in the west.

 

The capital is Nouakchott, right on the Atlantic Ocean, as the majority of the country is covered by the sand of the Sahara Desert.

 

The flag of Mauritania is very unusual because it only contains the colors gold and green and not the common flag colors in all other world flags: red, white or blue.  It was adopted on April 1, 1959 and consists of a green background with a central upward pointed crescent moon and star.

 

The gold symbolizes the sands of the Sahara Desert and the green is for Islam, while some consider that green symbolizes a bright future and growth. The crescent and star are also symbols of Islam and seen on other flags such as Turkey, Libya and Tunisia.

 

For this project, we recycled a Styrofoam tray that came with our meat from the grocery store. If you follow our lead, please soak it for a little bit in a mixture of water with a dash of soap/beach. I just added a few drops in a bucket and soaked it for a few minutes.   You can also buy them new, so I included the link below.

Supplies

Styrofoam tray
Xacto
Pencil
Scissors
Glue
Fabric paint
Ribbon
Felt cut into 2.5 x 4 inch pieces
Fabric glue
Printout of 2.5 x 4 inch Mauritania flag

I found a black and white outline of the Mauritania flag and made it the same size as our pre-cut felt pieces. My daughter cut out the flag.

She then cut out the moon and star from the inside of the flag.

She laid out the flag on the Syrofoam and outlined the whole flag first, then the moon and star on a differnet part of the tray.

She used the Xacto to cut out the main flag shape and also the moon and star.

Next she used the flag print out as a guide and glued the cut out moon and star Styrofoam pieces to the Styrofoam flag piece.  This will need to set, so she put it aside for half an hour or so.

Now the fun painting starts! She just squirted the fabric paint directly onto the moon and star.

She positioned the stamp directly over the felt flag, since they were the same size, and pushed down gently to get the paint to transform.  Every time she did a new flag, she added more paint. ( If a child messes up, you can flip it over to use the new side and place the banner against a wall. If your flag is going in a window, wait for the paint to dry, flip your flags over and do the over sides so both can be enjoyed. )

She let the paint dry and came back to used fabric glue to add a flag to the ribbon.  Our ribbons was nice and wide so she could flip it over to give the flag to make a nice trim.

She added the rest of her flags to the ribbon, leaving a few inches in between them. Let the fabric glue dry overnight. I put our banner between two heavy art books to make sure the ribbon stayed folded over the flags while it set.

The best part is now we have a stamp to use on another project later. Or buy more meat and create a whole new stamp to use.

If  you enjoyed making the stamp and would like to try your hand at another, try our Moon & Star Stamp {Tutorial}.

If you enjoyed learning about the Arab world, be sure to visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterst.

Arabic Letter Rose Door Decor {Tutorial}

Spring is in the air now that April is here.  Since it’s Arab American Heritage Month, my daughter and I decided to make a rose wreath for our front door celebrating the Arabic alphabet.

 

The Arabic word for rose is warda, وَرْد, which starts with the letter و.  We took that first letter and used a piece of chipboard, plus silk flowers, to make this simple door decor, in honor of our rose bushes that are started to wake up.

 

We hope you can see how easy it is to make and create your own.

 

Supplies

Chipboard or heavy cardboard
Hot glue
Scissors
Sharpie
Silk roses
Ribbon

 

I downloaded and printed out the letter و for my daughter and she cut it out of paper, flipped it backwards on the chipboard and traced it out with the Sharpie. The “flipping over backwards” will make sense in just a little bit.

She then cut out the letter from the cardboard.  The middle was a little hard for her and I ended up pulling out the Xacto, just FYI.

Here is her letter all cut up and flipped over the correct way.  The reason I had her trace the letter backwards is now the letter edges are clean and free of Sharpie markings.

It’s time to turn on the hot glue to place the silk roses. We laid out a few to see what our design would look like.

This part of the project was great for teamwork. I would glue the back of the roses and my daughter would decide where they went. We glued our three large roses first, then the medium sized roses.  This made tucking in the smaller flowers easier later.

When we were done, we had extra flowers left over. Now we have to think of another craft for them.

We waited a few minutes for the last few roses to dry, then flipped over the letter to add our ribbon.  We cut off a piece and used the hot glue to secure both ends.

We again waited a few minutes for the hot glue to set, then took our rose wreath to the front door for our neighbors to enjoy.

Please visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more fun ways to craft with the Arabic alphabet.