2019 Ramadan Crafts 30 Day Challenge Roundup {Resource}

Shukran (Arabic for thank you) to everyone that followed our Ramadan crafts 30 day daily challenge of creating an activity that teaches about Arab culture or the Muslim world.

My family would like to wish our blog reading community an Eid Mubarak.

Eid Al Fitr is today, the holiday that comes at the end of Ramadan and Eid Mubarak is a greeting that means Blessed Eid.

We started our 30 day Ramadan crafts challenge back in July 2011. Our tradition has continued annually through 2012, 2013, 2014. 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018.

Here are the 2019 Ramadan crafts daily challenge posts

Ramadan Day 1 Ramadan Perler Mosque {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 2 Ramadan Ice Cream Calendar {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 3 Lantern Love Decor {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 4 Arabesque Paint Chip Coasters {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 5 Teabag Folding Khatam Card {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 6 Protective Nazar Rocks {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 7 Ramadan Circle Wall Decor {Tutorial} Guest Post

Ramadan Day 8 Ramadan Indian Food Word Search {Printable} plus Let’s Celebrate Ramadan & Eid {Book Review}

Ramadan Day 9 Ramadan Moon and Star Bird Feeder {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 10 Nakba Shrinky Dink Key Chain {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 11 Moon and Star Bookmarks Card {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 12 Gallery Glass Zakat Minaret {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 13 Libya Collage Pin {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 14 Color Shift Glitterific Mosque Decor {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 15 Khatam Atom Caution Sign {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 16 Ramadan Popsicle Suncatcher {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 17 Moroccan Harira Soup {Recipe}

Ramadan Day 18 Eid Aperture Card {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 19 Bismillah Round Placemat {Tutorial} Guest Post

Ramadan Day 20 Ramadan Word Scramble {Printable}

Ramadan Day 21 Eid Sequence Paper Plate {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 22 Allah Gallery Glass Suncatcher {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 23 Arabesque Felt Tea Coaster {Tutorial} Guest Post

Ramadan Day 24 6 Kid Approved Stuffed Dates {Recipe}

Ramadan Day 25 Eid Gallery Glass Cheese Tray {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 26 Recycled Oui Tea Lights {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 27 Chocolate Moon and Star Krispie Treats {Recipe}

Ramadan Day 28 Arab Women Cartoon Book {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 29 Recycled Minaret Money Favor {Tutorial}

Ramadan Day 30 Recycled Cardboard Oud {Tutorial}

Stop by A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see more tutorials that teach about Muslim culture and the Arab world.

Arab Women Cartoon Book {Tutorial}

We spent the day Eid baking and needed the young ones out of the way. My oldest taught them how to make cartoon books with Arab women wearing traditional outfits.

Eid Al Fitr is the holiday at the end of Ramadan and is spent at social gatherings with friends and family.

Traditionally we have spent the weekend before Eid baking cookies at a friend’s home and this year was no exception.

While all the women were in the kitchen, my teen helped watch the young ones. She took a book of Arab women in traditional clothes and they spent the afternoon making cartoon books. She first drew them sample templates that they could trace or draw their own characters all together.

The only supplies this activity needs is pen, paper and coloring markers. The first step is to stack two sheets of paper on top of each other and fold them into three equal parts across the wide part of the papers.

Then my teen drew a Moroccan woman in traditional clothes holding a tagine in the middle section.

The next step is to cut across the narrow part of the paper on either side of the drawn character in two equal sections. Make sure to do this for both pieces of paper, both times not cutting the middle section.

Using the first woman as a guide, my daughter drew out the middle section of a different Arab woman from one of her sample templates.

Once my daughter had drawn four women on either side of the middle drawing, she colored them all in.

Now there are five different traditional outfits to choose from to create new funny characters.

If you enjoyed making this cartoon book, be sure to stop by these other book tutorials

Arabic English Handy Review Book {Tutorial}

Mini Eid Book {Tutorial}

Or visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see other activities that teach about the Arab world.

Moroccan Harira Soup {Recipe}

Harira is a Moroccan soup that is mostly eaten during Ramadan by residents but often made year round for visitors who want a local taste.

The name harira, derived from the Arabic word meaning silk, takes it’s name from the texture of the soup after it’s been thickened with the egg at the end.

While I was visiting Morocco, I was surprised at the different ways it was made. From the hotel in Rabat to the riad in Tétouan, they each had their own spin.

I wanted to try out my version tonight that I thought my family would like and they loved it. I used beef and my youngest said she would like to try it with chicken next time, while my husband wanted a version with no meat. We’ll keep playing around with it and if you do make it for your family, make sure to let us know!

Ingredients

  • 1 pound beef
  • 2 TB Olive oil
  • 1 Onion
  • 3 Celery stalks
  • 3 Carrots
  • 1 cup Lentils
  • 1 can drained Chickpeas
  • Parsley bunch
  • Cilantro bunch
  • 1 can Tomato sauce
  • 8 cups beef bouillon/broth
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • 1 cup rice
  • 1 Egg
  • 2 TB Flour
  • 2 TB Lemon juice
  • 2 cups water

I started by browning the meat in the olive oil.

Once it was done, I set it aside in my cooking pot and used the meat juices to cook the chopped onion. After five minutes of medium heat, I added the celery and carrots.

I also added all the spices and cooked everything for an additional five minutes.

Now that the celery and carrots had softened just a little, I added the meat mixture on top so I could use the pot to get the water mixture started. I boiled the eight cups of beef broth and added the chickpeas, lentils and tomato sauce. Once everything started to boil, I added the meat and other vegetables back in to simmer for one hour.

My timer told me after an hour that it was time to add the finally chopped parsley and cilantro and let that cook for an additional ten minutes.

While that was on the stove, I whisked together the water, egg, flour and lemon juice and slowly added it in for an additional five minutes.

The soup is wonderful with bread to help soak up the last few drops. Be sure to leave leftovers for the next day. One of my favorite foods for breakfast at the Rabat hotel was their harira and many Moroccans swear their favorite soup is best eaten as a leftover.

If you enjoyed making this soup, make sure you stop by these other yummy foods to make for Ramadan

Libyan Sharba Soup {Recipe}

Palestinian Spinach and Lentil Soup {Recipe}

Visit A Crafty Arab on Pinterest to see what other foods you can make from the Arab world.